Finding and Applying for Jobs in Physiotherapy

Applying for Jobs

Every employer you apply to will have a different approach to recruitment. You will need to become familiar with this and adapt your application accordingly. Attend any talks given by staff coming into the university to help you apply. Attend Physiotherapy Fairs and student conferences where you will get specific advice and up to date information on employers' recruitment needs.  

To help you prepare for interviews look at some of the questions physiotherapy students have been asked in the past:

What would you do if you were in charge and:

  • A patient wanted to discharge himself
  • A fire broke out in your work area

How would you deal with the following?

  • A nervous patient?
  • A patient who was refusing to co-operate with your treatment plan?
  • A patient who was drunk?

Other questions

  • Would you always do as the doctor asks?
  • How would you go about implementing change in your department?
  • Why did you decide to become a physiotherapist?
  • Why have you applied for this post in particular?
  • What has been/was the most challenging aspect of your course?
  • What have you enjoyed/did you enjoy most about your course?
  • What did you gain from your placements?
  • What was the most challenging thing you had to deal with in your work experience or on your clinical placements so far?
  • Tell me about a distressing incident you experienced when dealing with a patient and how you coped with it.
  • You mention looking for non verbal clues when speaking to patients.  Give me an example of this.
  • Talk me through how you would explain pelvic floor exercises to a new mother.
  • Give me an example of when you have had to think on your feet
  • Describe a situation that demonstrates that you can work effectively as part of a team.
  • Can you tell me about a situation when you have had to use your communication skills in dealing with patients or colleagues.
  • Relatives of a patient, for whom you have primary responsibility, make a complaint about the care that the patient is receiving. How do you handle this situation? 
  • A patient is lying on the floor of the ward and is having difficulty breathing. What do you do?
  • How do you think cultural differences can affect treatment?
  • What is your vision in relation to the rehabilitation and enablement of patients?

  • What do you think are the main challenges facing the NHS today?
  • What do you think are your main strengths and weaknesses?
  • How do you see your career developing over the next 5 years?
  • Why should we offer you this job?
  • How do you keep up to date with current issues?
  • Tell me about some research/NHS policy you have recently read about.
  • How will you make sure you keep your professional practice up to date?
  • What would you do if you did not get on with another staff member and it was causing problems?
  • What do you think is the most important quality or skill for a physiotherapist?
  • How has your previous work experience been of benefit to you in your training and placements?
  • What has been the most challenging aspect of your course?
  • Describe a difficult situation that you encountered during a clinical placement?
  • What do you think are your main strengths and weaknesses?
  • Give me an example of when you have had to think on your feet?
  • Describe a situation that demonstrates that you can work effectively as part of a team.
  • Can you tell me about a situation when you have had to use your communications skills in dealing with patients, families or colleagues.
  • Relatives of a patient, for whom you have primary responsibility, make a complaint about the care that the patient is receiving. How do you handle this situation? 
  • What do you think are the main challenges facing the NHS today?
  • What are the main issues facing the physiotherapy profession today?

Further study  

The CSP website gives further information on career development opportunities by going onto specialist in service training courses and postgraduate courses, careers and development. There are also downloadable publications, an ePortfolio tool reduced-fee events, an online library and discount available on books and journals.

You can use resources such as findamasters.com and findaPhD.com to research a broader range of postgraduate opportunities.  The Prospects postgraduate study section is an excellent resource for researching all aspects of postgraduate study including funding, a course search facility by course type, location and subject area and advice on studying abroad.  

Last modified: 
Tuesday, February 27, 2018 - 14:58